OSHA and Environment Questions: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is an agency of the United States Department of Labor. Congress established the agency under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act), which President Richard M. Nixon signed into law on December 29, 1970. OSHA’s mission is to “assure safe and healthy working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance”. The agency is also charged with enforcing a variety of whistleblower statutes and regulations. OSHA is currently headed by Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor Loren Sweatt. OSHA’s workplace safety inspections have been shown to reduce injury rates and injury costs without adverse effects to employment, sales, credit ratings, or firm survival.OSHA and Environment Questions

1. Under the OSH Act, employers are responsible for providing a ______
a) Safe workplace
b) Land
c) Insurance
d) Estimation
Answer: a
Explanation: Under the OSH Act, employers are accountable for providing a safe and healthful workplace. OSHA’s mission is to assure safe and healthful workplaces by enforcing standards, and by providing training, outreach, education and help.

2. OSHA was created to _____
a) Data analysis
b) To reduce hazards
c) Ecological development
d) EIA analysis
Answer:b
Explanation: OSHA was created mainly to encourage employees and employers to reduce workplace hazards and to implement safety and health programs.

3. Which act establishes responsibilities and rights for employers and employees?
a) SARA
b) RCRA
c) CERCLA
d) OSHA
Answer: d
Explanation: OSHA establishes training programs, develops mandatory job safety and health standards, and encourages to enforce them.

4. OSHA is part of the ______ department of labour.
a) UK
b) US
c) India
d) Australia
Answer: b
Explanation: OSHA is part of US department of labour and is responsible for conducting job site inspections to ensure safety at workplace.

5. In the case of fatal accident, when should be a report filed for nearest OSHA office?
a) Within 24 hours
b) Within 48 hours
c) Within 8 hours
d) Within 4 hours
Answer: c
Explanation: In case of lethal accident, a report to the nearest OSHA office should be filed within 8 hours and also when one that results in the hospitalization of three or more employees.

6. OSHA assignment is to set standards and conduct _____
a) Inspections
b) Tests
c) Analysis
d) Estimation
Answer: a
Explanation: OSHA has two regulatory functions: setting standards and conducting inspections to ensure that employers are providing safe and healthful workplaces. OSHA standards may require that employers adopt certain practices, methods, or processes reasonably necessary and appropriate to protect workers on the job.

7. OSHA ensures that employees have been provided with _____
a) Job
b) PPE
c) Insurance
d) Security
Answer: b
Explanation: OSHA ensures that employees are effectively trained on, have been provided with personal protective equipment and use when required for safety or health. Employees must comply with all rules and regulations that apply to their own actions and conduct.

8. Under OSHA, employee has the right to access medical records. True or False.
a) True
b) False
Answer: a
Explanation: The access to medical and exposure records, regulation provides a right of access to employees, their designated representatives, and OSHA to relevant medical records, including records related to that employee’s exposure to toxic substances.

9. Hazard communication in OSHA conducts _____
a) Chemical analysis
b) Toxic exposure
c) Strength analysis
d) Hazard evaluations of the products
Answer: d
Explanation: Hazard communication standard requires manufacturers and importers of hazardous materials to conduct hazard evaluations of the products they manufacture or import. If a product is found to be hazardous under the terms of the standard, the manufacturer or importer must so indicate on containers of the material, and the first shipment of the material to a new customer must include MSDS.

10. The OSHA Form 300 is an injury/illness log.
a) Injury
b) Analysis
c) Finance
d) Assistance
Answer: a
Explanation: The OSHA Form 300 is an injury/illness log, with a separate line entry for each recordable injury or illness. The events include work-related deaths, injuries, and illnesses other than minor injuries that require only first aid treatment and that do not involve medical treatment, loss of consciousness, restriction of work, or transfer to another job.

11. When should be the form 300A posted?
a) January
b) February
c) March
d) April
Answer: b
Explanation: Each year, the employer must clearly post in the workplace a Form 300A, which includes a summary of the previous year’s work-related injuries and illnesses. The Form 300A must be posted by February 1 and kept in place until at least April 30.

12. What is OSHA Form 301?
a) Sickness log
b) Individual incident report
c) Chemical log
d) Finance log
Answer: b
Explanation: OSHA Form 301 is an individual incident report that provides added detail about each specific recordable injury or illness. An alternative form, such as an insurance or workers compensation form that provides the same details may be substituted for OSHA Form 301.
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13. Employers in statistically low-hazard industries are exempt from maintaining OSHA 300 form records. True or False.
a) True
b) False
Answer: a
Explanation: Employers with 10 or fewer employees and employers in statistically low-hazard industries (listed in 29 CFR 1904, Sub-part B) are exempt from maintaining OSHA Form 300 records.

14. Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) recognizes _____
a) Small employers who operate safety and health management system
b) Large employers who operate safety and health management system
c) All employers who operate safety and health management system
d) Workers who operate safety and health management system
Answer: a
Explanation: Employers who are accepted into SHARP are accepted as models for worksite safety and health. Upon receiving SHARP recognition, the worksite will be excused from programmed inspections during the period that the SHARP certification is valid.

15. When was OSHA enacted?
a) 1980
b) 1930
c) 1945
d) 1970
Answer: d
Explanation: The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act) was enacted by Congress in 1970 and authorized the Secretary of Labour to establish Federal standards to ensure safe workplace conditions.

Major OSH Laws & Regulations

On the basis of these Directive Principles and international instruments, the Government of India declares its policy, priorities, strategies and purposes through the exercise of its power. The Government of India has enacted the statutes relating to Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) at workplaces. At present, comprehensive safety and health statutes for regulating Occupational Safety and Health at workplaces mainly exist in respect of the four sectors namely, manufacturing, mining, ports, and construction. There are four main legislations that cover Occupational Safety and Health at workplace. (i) The Factories Act, 1948 , covering factories wherein the enforcement of safety at workplace is by the Chief Inspector of Factories in the respective states, (ii) The Mines Act, 1952 and Mines Rules, 1955 for mining industry where the enforcement is by the Directorate General of Mines Safety (DGMS) under Ministry of Labour & Employment , Government of India, (iii) The Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Act,1986 followed by notification of the Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Regulations, 1990 dealing with the major ports of India and the enforcement is by the Directorate General of Factory Advice Service &Labour Institutes (DGFASLI), under Ministry of Labour & Employment , Government of India, and (iv) The Building & Other Construction Workers (Regulations of Employment and Conditions of Service) Act, 1996 , covering construction workers at construction sites wherein the enforcement is by the Directorate General Labour Welfare in the central sphere and by the Labour Commissioners/Factory Inspectorates in the States/UTs.

The Factories Act, 1948

The First Factories Act in India was passed in 1881. Though this legislation was initiated to promote the interest of the producers in Lancashire and Manchester in United Kingdom, it has since then steadily developed into a welfare measure of wide contents and coverage through innumerable amendments and re-enactments. As observed by the Supreme Court of India in the case of Nagpur Electric Light and Power Company the scope of the factory legislation has been now very much enlarged in order to secure health, safety, welfare, proper working hours, leaves, working conditions and benefits for the workers employed in factories. Under the present Act factory means any premises in which 10 or more workers are working and a manufacturing process is carried on with the aid of power; any premises in which 20 or more workers are working and a manufacturing process is carried on without the aid of power. Recently this definition has undergone change in some of the states of India where under the Act, factory means any premises in which 20 or more workers are working and a manufacturing process is carried on with the aid of power; any premises in which 40 or more workers are working and a manufacturing process is carried on without the aid of power. Chapter II of the Act deals with The Inspection Staff, Chapter III of the Act deals with Health and Chapter IV deals with Safety. Chapter IV A (Provisions Relating to Hazardous Processes) was added to the present Act in 1988 {after the Bhopal Gas Tragedy on the night of 2-3 December 1984 at the Union Carbide India Limited pesticide plant in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh wherein over 500,000 people were exposed to methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas and other chemicals.} with: -Section 41 A – Dealing with Constitution of Site Appraisal Committees -Section 41 B – Dealing with Compulsory disclosure by occupier -Section 41 C – Dealing with Specific responsibility of the occupier in relation to hazardous processes -Section 41 D – Dealing with Power of Central Government to appoint Inquiry Committees -Section 41 E – Dealing with Emergency Standards -Section 41 F – Dealing with Permissible limits of exposure of chemicals and toxic substances -Section 41 G – Dealing with Workers participation in safety management -Section 41 H – Dealing with Right of workers to warn against imminent danger. Chapter VII of the Act deals with employment of young persons and prohibits the employment of any person below the age of 14 years. Chapter IX of the Act has Special Provisions with Section 85– Dealing with Power to apply the Act to certain premises wherein the State Government by notification declare that all or any of the provisions of the Act will apply to any place where a manufacturing process is carried out with or without the aid of power -Section 87– Dealing with Dangerous operations, wherein the State Government is of opinion that any manufacturing process or operations carried out in a factory is dangerous then it can restrict employment of women, provide for periodical medical examination , prohibit / restrict / control use of any specified material / process -Section 88– Dealing with notice of certain accidents; -Section 88 A– Dealing with notice of certain dangerous occurrences -Section 89– Dealing with notice of certain diseases -Section 90– Dealing with Power to direct enquiry into cases of accidents and certain disease -Section 91– Dealing with Power to take samples -Section 91A– Dealing with safety and occupational health surveys.

Dock Workers (Safety, Health & Welfare) Act, 1986 & The Dock Workers (Safety, Health & Welfare) Regulations, 1990

Considering the hazardous nature of dock work, the ILO as early as in 1929 adopted an international convention to protect dock workers against accidents. This convention was revised in 1932. The history of safety legislation of dock workers in India dates back to 1934 where the Indian Dock Labourers Act, 1934 was enacted to give effect to this ILO Convention viz., “Protection Against Accidents (Dockers) Convention (Revised), 1932 (No.32)”. The main objective of the Act was to make the working places and working procedures safe. Due to the Second World War, the Indian Dock Labourers Regulation, 1948 framed under the Act could be brought into force in the year 1948 only. The Act and the Regulations were limited in scope as they covered only safety aspects and that too for workers employed on board and alongside the ships and thus a large number of workers engaged in other areas of the ports such as transit sheds, warehouses, yards etc., were not covered. As the necessity arose to include health and welfare provisions, the Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare)) Scheme, 1961 was framed under the Dock Workers (Regulation of Employment) Act, 1948 to cover the rest of the workers working elsewhere in the port premises. In order to ratify the ILO Conventions 152 and also to implement the recommendation of the National Commission on Labour, a unified Act, viz., the Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Act, 1986 was enacted and the detailed Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Regulations were framed in 1990. The enforcement of the Act and the Regulations is carried out by the Inspectorates Dock Safety functioning in all the major ports under the administrative control of the Director General, DGFASLI, Ministry of Labour, Government of India. The Director General, DGFASLI as Chief Inspector of Dock Safety is also responsible for enforcement of the Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemicals Rules, 1989 framed under the Environment (Protection) Act 1996 in the Major Ports.

The Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Regulations, 1990 was framed under the Section 20 of the Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Act, 1986. Regulations 9 to 94 in Part III of the Dock Workers(Safety, Health and Welfare)Regulations, 1990 are covering safety aspects in the working places, warehouses and storage places, decks and Hatch ways etc., Lifting Appliances and Gear, Transport Equipment and Operations, Handling of Cargo, Handling of Dangerous Goods, Freight Container Terminals, Miscellaneous. Regulations 95 to 99 in Part IV of the Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Regulations, 1990 are covering health aspects like cleanliness, drinking water, latrines and urinals, spittoons, ventilation and temperature in dock area including reefer holds on ships. Regulations 100 to 109 in Part V of the Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare)Regulations, 1990 are covering welfare facilities like washing facilities, First-Aid boxes, ambulance room, ambulance carriage, stretchers, shelters or rest rooms and lunch rooms, canteens, medical examination of dock workers, notices, welfare officers.

The Mines Act, 1952 and other laws pertaining to Mines

In earlier years when mining activities were modest in scale, safety problems too were simple. With the progress in exploitation of minerals, safety of persons employed became a matter of concern. In 1895, the Government of India initiated steps to frame legislative measures for safety of workmen. In 1897 first major disaster in mining hit the Kolar Goldfields killing 52 persons, to be soon followed by the Khost Coal Mine disaster in Baluchistan (now in Pakistan) killing 47 persons. The disaster hastened the process of formulation of safety laws and the first Mines Act was enacted in 1901. With further experience, this Act was superseded by the Indian Mines Act, 1923, which was again replaced by the present Mines Act, 1952 with amendments in 1959. On 27 Dec 1975 the Chasnala mining disaster occurred in a coal mine in Chasnala near Dhanbad in the Indian state of Bihar now called Jharkhand, when an explosion in the mine followed by flooding of water killed 372 miners. The roof of coal caved in resulting in 7 million imperial gallons (32,000 m3) of water per minute flooding into the mine. The miners were trapped under a mountain of debris and drowned when the water surged into the mine. The Indian Iron and Steel Company (IISCO), which owned the mine, said it conformed to international standards. A Hindi film KaalaPathar depicting the tragedy was also produced. Major changes were incorporated in this Act in 1983. The Mines Act, 1952 applies to mines of all minerals within the country except the State of Sikkim, including the offshore mines within the limits of territorial water. For administering the provisions of the Indian Mines Act, 1901, the Government of India set up a “Bureau of Mines Inspection” on the 7th January 1902 with headquarters at Calcutta. The name of the organisation was changed to Department of Mines in 1904 and its headquarters shifted to Dhanbad in 1908. On 1.1.1960, the organization was renamed as “Office of the Chief Inspector of Mines”. Since 1.5.1967, the office has been re-designated as Directorate-General of Mines Safety (DGMS in short). The Mines Act, 1952 deals with the matters relating to safety, health and welfare of persons employed in mines including oil mines. The Act specifies the provisions for regulating employment of persons, leave with wages, duties and responsibilities of owner, agent and manager, drinking water, First-Aid and rest shelters, medical examinations and occupational health surveys, notice of accidents and occupational diseases in addition to framing of rules, regulations and byelaws on specific subjects including the penalty provisions for violations of this Act. The following Laws dealing with OSH are applicable to Mines: Mines Act, 1952 Coal Mines Regulations, 1957 Metalliferous Mines Regulations, 1961 Oil Mines Regulations, 1984 Mines Rules, 1955 Mines Vocational Training Rules, 1966 Mines Rescue Rules, 1985 Mines Creche Rules, 1966 Electricity Act, 2003 Factories Act, 1948: Chapter III & IV Manufacture, Storage & Import of Hazardous Chemicals Rules, 1989 – under Environmental Protection Act, 1986 Land Acquisition (Mines) Act, 1885 The Coal Mines (Conservation & Development) Act, 1974

The Building & Other Construction Workers (Regulations of Employment and Conditions of Service) Act, 1996

The Building and Other Construction Workers (Regulations of Employment and Conditions of Service) Act, 1996 aims at regulating the employment and conditions of services of building and other construction workers and providing for their safety, health and welfare measures. The BOCW Act, 1996 in Chapter VII under Safety & Health Measures in Section 38 deals with Safety Committee and safety officers in every establishment wherein five hundred or more building workers are ordinarily employed; Section 39 deals with Notice of certain accidents, where in any establishment an accident occurs which causes death or which causes any bodily injury by reason of which the person injured is prevented from working for a period of forty-eight hours or more immediately following the accident, or which is of such a nature as may be prescribed, the employer shall give notice thereof to such authority, in such form and within such time as may be prescribed; Section 40 deals with Power of appropriate Government to make rules for the safety and health of building and other construction workers on following matters.

  • safe means of access to, and safety of any working place, including the provision of suitable and sufficient scaffolding at various stages when work cannot be safely done from the ground or from any part of a building or from a ladder or such other means of support;
  • precautions to be taken in connection with the demolition of the whole or any substantial part of a building or other structure under the supervision of a competent person and the avoidance of danger from collapse of any building or other structure while removing any part of the framed building or other structure by shoring or otherwise;
  • handling or use of explosive under the control of competent persons so that there is no exposure to the risk of injury from explosion or from flying material;
  • erection, installation, use and maintenance of transporting equipment, such as locomotives, trucks, wagons and other vehicles and trailers and appointment of competent persons to drive or operate such equipment;
  • erection, installation, use and maintenance of hoists, lifting appliances and lifting gear including periodical testing and examination and heat treatment, where necessary, precautions to be taken while raising or lowering loads, restrictions on carriage of persons and appointment of competent persons on hoists or other lifting appliances;
  • adequate and suitable lighting of every workplace and approach thereto, of every place where raising or lowering operations with the use of hoists, lifting appliances or lifting gears are in progress and of all openings dangerous to building workers employed;
  • precautions to be taken to prevent inhalation of dust, fumes, gases or vapours during any grinding, cleaning, spraying or manipulation of any material and steps to be taken to secure and maintain adequate ventilation of every working place or confined space;
  • measures to be taken during stacking or unshackling, stowing or unstowing of materials or goods or handling in connection therewith;
  • safeguarding of machinery including the fencing of every fly-wheel and every moving part of a prime mover and every part of transmission or other machinery, unless it is in such a position or of such construction as to be safe to every worker working on any of the operations and as if it were securely fenced;
  • safe handling and use of plant, including tools and equipment operated by compressed air;
  • precautions to be taken in case of fire;
  • limits of weight to be lifted or moved by workers;
  • safe transport of workers to or from any workplace by water and provision of means for rescue from drowning;
  • steps to be taken to prevent danger to workers from live electric wires or apparatus including electrical machinery and tools and from overhead wires;
  • keeping of safety nets, safety sheets and safety belts where the special nature or the circumstances of work render them necessary for the safety of the workers;
  • standards to be complied with regard to scaffolding, ladders and stairs, lifting appliances, ropes, chains and accessories, earth moving equipments and floating operational equipments;
  • precautions to be taken with regard to pile driving, concrete work, work with hot asphalt, tar or other similar things, insulation work, demolition operations, excavation, underground construction and handling materials;
  • safety policy, that is to say, a policy relating to steps to be taken to ensure the safety and health of the building workers, the administrative arrangements there for and the matters connected therewith, to be framed by the employers and contractors for the operations to be carried on in a building or other construction work;
  • information to be furnished to the Bureau of Indian Standards established under the Bureau of Indian Standards Act, 1986 (63 of 1986), regarding the use of any article or process covered under that Act in a building or other construction work;
  • provision and maintenance of medical facilities for building workers;
  • any other matter concerning the safety and health of workers working in any of the operations being carried on in a building or other construction work.

Other related legislations on Safety, Health and Environment

Apart from the four main legislations mentioned above, there are legislations relating to certain substances, machinery, environment which also addresses certain issue of safety and health. These statutes are applicable to all sectors including the unorganized sectors:

The Indian Boilers Act, 1923 (amended2007)

An Act is to consolidate and amend the law relating to steam boilers, The Indian Boilers Regulations, 1950 (amended2010) and The Boilers Rules of respective States.

The Dangerous Machines (Regulation) Act, 1983

An Act to provide for the regulation of trade and commerce in production, supply, distribution and use of the product of any industry producing dangerous machines with a view to securing the welfare of labour, operating any such machine and for payment of compensation for death or bodily injury suffered by any labourer while operating any such a machine and for matters connected there with or incidental there to. The act is supplemented by the Dangerous Machines (Regulation) Rules, 1984 (amended2007).

The Motor Transport Workers Act, 1961 (amended 1986)

An Act to provide for the welfare of motor transport workers and to regulate the conditions of their work. The act is supplemented by the Motor Transport Workers Rules, 1964.

The Plantation Labour Act, 1951 (amended 2010) and Rules there under

This act provides for the welfare of labours and to regulate the conditions of work in plantations.

The Beedi Cigar Workers (Conditions of Employment) Act, 1966 (amended 1993)

This act provides for the welfare of the workers in beedi and cigar establishments and to regulate the conditions of their work and for matters connected there with. The respective State Governments have notified the State Rules under the Act.

The Shops and Commercial Establishments Acts

The Act enacted by respective State Governments covers items of cleanliness, ventilation, lighting, precaution against fire and provision of first-aid box.

The Explosives Act, 1884 (amended 1983)

This act provides for regulating the manufacture, possession, use, sale, transport, import and export of Explosives. Also there are The Explosives Rules, 2008 (amended 2011), The Static and Mobile Pressure Vessels (unfired) Rules, 1981 & 2016, The Gas Cylinders Rules, 1981 & 2016 and The Ammonium Nitrate Rules, 2012.

The Petroleum Act, 1934

An Act to consolidate and amend the law relating to the import, transport, storage, production, refining and blending of petroleum. Also there are The Petroleum Rules, 2002 (amended 2011) and The Calcium Carbide Rules, 1987.

The Inflammable Substances Act, 1952

An Act to declare certain substances to be dangerously inflammable and to provide of the regulation of their import, transport, storage and production by applying there to The Petroleum Act and the rules there under and for certain matters connected with such regulation.

The Insecticides Act, 1968 (amended 2000)

An Act to regulate the import, manufacture, sale, transport, distribution and use of insecticides with a view to prevent risk to human beings or animals and for matters connected there with. Insecticide also means any substance specified in the schedule or such other substances (including fungicides and weedicides) or any such preparation containing one or more such substances as notified from time to time. There is also prohibition against sale or storage of insecticides in certain places (Section 13 Rule 10-C), leaflet to be contained in package, so as to inform the user (Rule 18), the use of protective clothing (Rule 39), respiratory devices (Rule 40), provision of antidotes and first aid medicines (Rule 41), aerial spraying operations (Rule 43) and disposal of used packages, surplus material and washing of insecticide (Rule 44). Cautionary symbols and word POISON has to be written on the label of the packed product. It means every action right from start to finish of the insecticide business falls in purview of Insecticide Act, 1968 and the Rules there under.

The Oil Fields (Regulation and Development) Act, 1948

An Act to provide for the regulation of oil fields and for the development of mineral oil resources. Also there are The Petroleum and Natural Gas (Safety in Offshore Operations) Rules, 2009.

The Petroleum and Natural Gas Regulation Board Act, 2006

An Act to provide for the establishment of Petroleum and Natural Gas Regulatory Board to regulate the refining, processing, storage, transportation, distribution, marketing and sale of petroleum, petroleum products and natural gas excluding production of crude oil and natural gas so as to protect the interests of consumers and entities. Plus The Petroleum and Natural Gas (Appointment of Consultants) Regulations, 2007. Plus The Petroleum and Natural Gas Regulatory Board (Technical Standards and Specifications including Safety Standards for City or Local Natural Gas Distribution Networks) Regulations, 2008. Plus The Petroleum and Natural Gas (Safety in Offshore Operations) Rules, 2008. Plus ThePetroleum andNatural Gas (Code of Practice for Emergency Response and Disaster Management Plan) Regulations, 2010.

The Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 (amended 1991)

An Act to provide for the protection and improvement of environment and matters connected therewith. There are also various Rules which are listed below • The Environment (Protection) Rules, 1986 (amended 2010) • The Manufacture Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemicals Rules, 1989 (amended 2000) • The Rules for Manufacture, Use, Import, Export and Storage of Hazardous Micro Organisms, Genetically Engineered Organisms or Cells, 1989 (amended 2010) • The Hazardous and Other Wastes (Management and Transboundary Movement) Rules, 2016 [Suppressed the Hazardous Wastes (Management, Handling and Transboundry Movement) Rules, 2008] • The Chemical Accidents (Emergency Planning, Preparedness and Response) Rules, 1996 • The Bio-Medical Waste Management Rules, 2016 [Suppressed the Bio-Medical Waste (Management & Handling) Rules, 1998] • The Recycled Plastics Manufacture and Usage Rules, 1999 (amended 2003) • The Noise Pollution (Regulation & Control) Rules, 2000 (amended 2010) • The Ozone Depleting Substances (Regulation & Control) Rules, 2000 (amended 2007) • The Solid Waste Management Rules, 2016 [Suppressed the Municipal Solid Wastes (Management & Handling) Rules, 2000] • The Construction and Demolition Waste Management Rules, 2016 [Suppressed the Municipal Solid Wastes (Management & Handling) Rules, 2000] • The Batteries (Management & Handling) Rules, 2001 (amended 2010) • The Environmental Impact Assessment Notification, 2006(amended 2013) • The Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016 [Suppressed the Plastic waste Management and Handling Rules, 2011] • The E-Waste (Management) Rules, 2016 w.e.f 1st October, 2016 [Suppressed the E-waste Management and Handling Rules, 2011] •The Coastal Regulation Zone Notification, 2011.

The Water (Preventions Control of Pollution) Act, (Amended 1988)

An Act to provide for the prevention and control of water pollution and the maintaining or restoring of whole someness of water, for the establishment, with a view to carrying out the purposes aforesaid, of Boards for the prevention and control of water pollution, for conferring on and assigning to such Boards powers and functions relating thereto and for matters connected therewith. Plus The Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Rules, 1975.

The Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Cess Act, 1977 (Amended 2003)

An Act to provide for the levy and collection of a cess on water consumed by persons carrying on certain industries and by local authorities, with a view to augment the resources of the Central Board and the State Boards for the prevention and control of water pollution constituted under the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974 and the Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Cess Rules, 1978.

The Air (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1981 (Amended 1987)

An Act to provide for the prevention, control and abatement of air pollution, for the establishment , with a view to carrying out the aforesaid purposes, of Boards, for conferring on and assigning to such Boards powers and functions relating thereto and for matters connected therewith the Air (Preventions & Control of Pollution) Rules, 1982.

The Public Liability Insurance Act, 1991 (Amended 1992)

An Act to provide for public liability insurance for the purpose of providing immediate relief to the persons affected by accident occurring while handling any hazardous substance and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto.

The National Green Tribunal Act, 2010

An Act for effective and expeditious disposal of cases relating to environmental protection and conservation of forests and other natural resources and giving relief and compensation for damages to persons and property. • The National Green Tribunal (Practice & Procedure) Rules, 2011

The Motor Vehicles Act, 1988 (Amended 2013)

An Act to consolidate and amend the law relating to motor vehicles. Plus The Central Motor Vehicles Rules, 1989(amended 2005) and Motor Vehicles Rules of respective States.

The Atomic Energy Act, 1962 (Amended 1987)

An Act to provide for the development, control and use of atomic energy for the welfare of the people of India and for other peaceful purposes and for matters connected therewith. There are also various Rules which are listed below: • The Atomic Energy (Radiation Protection) Rules, 2004 • The Atomic Energy (Working of Mines, Minerals and handling of Prescribed Substances) Rules, 1984 • The Atomic Energy (Safe Disposal of Radioactive Wastes) Rules, 1987 • The Atomic Energy (Radiation Processing of Food and Allied Products) Rules, 2012 • The Atomic Energy (Factories) Rules, 1996

The Electricity Act, 2003 (Amended 2007)

An Act to consolidate the laws relating to generation, transmission, distribution, trading and use of electricity and generally for taking measures conducive to development of electricity industry, promoting competition therein, protecting interest of consumers and supply of electricity to all areas, rationalisation of electricity tariff, ensuring transparent policies regarding subsidies, promotion of efficient and environmentally benign policies, constitution of Central Electricity Authority, Regulatory Commissions and establishment of Appellate Tribunal and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. There are also certain regulations with this Act and they are The Central Electricity Authority (Measures Relating to Safety & Electricity Supply) Regulations, 2010. The Central Electricity Authority (Safety Requirements for Construction, Operation and Maintenance of Electric Plants and Electric Lines) Regulations, 2011

The Energy Conservation Act, 2001 (amended 2010)

An Act to provide for efficient use of energy and its conservation and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto.

The Disaster Management Act, 2005

An Act to provide for effective management of disasters and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto.

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